20 Tools Every Writer Needs

A Writer's Path

by ARHuelsenbeck

Are you ready to get serious about your writing? Set yourself up for success by stocking up on the things you’ll need:

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The Terracotta Army marches into Liverpool

 

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These ancient and beautiful artefacts can’t fail to amaze as they make a rare outing from their home in Xi’an in the People’s Republic of China.

As well as the life-size terracotta figures themselves, which are very impressive on their own, they are accompanied by a wide range of well displayed artefacts, all of which add to the story-telling perfectly.

Telling the history of the China’s first Emperor, Qin Shi Huang, and the subsequent dynasty’s, the scale and drama of an emerging history is explained and displayed beautifully, including the spectacular excesses as well as some of the more day-to-day lives of those involved in what was often a most brutal command.

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History, geography, human interest, horror, and poignancy are all displayed in an atmospheric setting with a well-planned visitor experience that leaves room to view and absorb the exhibits in this popular collection.

It can’t compete with the full Xi’an experience and the home of the warriors,
but the flavour delivered in Liverpool’s World Museum, was well worth the visit.

Read my poem on the subject HERE

 

What Fiction Classifications Can Tell You About Your Readers

A Writer's Path

by Andrea Lundgren

You can’t always tell who’s going to pick up your story and read it. Sometimes, readers are unpredictable. Those who don’t read your genre may stumble upon it and read it anyways, and what speaks to one person won’t to another.

But you can tell some things about your own story based on the fiction classification. This isn’t a genre-thing, but more a flavor of the story based on character, plot, and description, and it can tell you something about why someone would pick up your story. Not all readers read for the same reason, and sometimes, a reader who generally favors one kind of fiction may want another kind as a change of pace.

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An amusing view of Grandparents, by children

I can’t take any credit for this piece, but I thought it was wonderful, please feel free to share it if you do too.

————————————–

*WHO ARE* *GRANDPARENTS?*
🎅🤶

✍written by
a class of 8-year-olds
😘Grandparents are
a lady and a man
who have no little children of their own.

😘They like other people’s children.

😘A grandfather is a man, and a grandmother is a lady!

😘Grandparents don’t have to do anything except be there when we come to see them.

😘They are so old they shouldn’t play hard or run.

😘It is good if they drive us to the shops and give us money.

😘When they take us for walks, they slow down past things like pretty leaves and caterpillars.

😘They show us and talk to us about the colors of the flowers and also why we shouldn’t step on ‘cracks.’

😘They don’t say, ‘Hurry up.’

😘Usually they are fat but not too fat to tie your shoes.

😘They wear glasses and funny underwear.

😘They can take their teeth and gums out.

😘Grandparents don’t have to be smart.

😘They have to answer questions like ‘Why isn’t God married?’ and ‘How come dogs chase cats?’

😘When they read to us, they don’t skip.

😘They don’t mind if we ask for the same story over again.

😘Everybody should try to have a grandmother, especially if you don’t have television because they are the only grownups who like to spend time with us…

😘They know we should have snack time before bed time.

😘They say prayers with us and kiss us even when we’ve acted bad.

😘Grandpa is the smartest man on earth!

😘He teaches me good things, but I don’t get to see him enough to get as smart as him!

👦​A 6-year-old was asked where his grandma lived.
🗯
”Oh,”
he said,
🗯
”she lives at the airport🛬, and when we want her, we just go get her. Then when we’re done having her visit, we take her back to the airport🛫.”

 

How to Write Children’s Picture Books: Buy, Borrow, But Don’t Steal! (Part 3)

A Writer's Path

by Yvonne Blackwood

Now that you have a fabulous idea for your children’s book—the tale of Ronnie Rabbit—and you have researched both the subject and the market, you are ready to write.

Wait! Not so fast! Assuming that this writing project is not just a one-time exercise, you should prepare a bit more.

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